Skip navigation

Transit to Trails

TriMet is your connection to nature in the city

Transit to Trails

The Portland metropolitan area has more than 10,000 acres of parks and natural areas. We invite you to leave the car at home and take TriMet to enjoy our wealth of outdoor beauty. Here are some destinations we think you'll like.

 

Beaverton

Tualatin Hills Nature Park

M.O. Stevens/Wikimedia

Tualatin Hills Nature Park

15655 SW Millikan Way, Beaverton

 

The Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District maintains a 60-mile trail system that includes the Tualatin Hills Nature Park. This wildlife preserve features evergreen and deciduous forests, creeks, wetlands, ponds, meadows, trails and an interpretive center. 5 miles of loop trails, all accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

MAX Blue Line, Merlo Rd/SW 158th Ave Station

Plan your trip

 

 

Westside Trail

15655 SW Millikan Way, Beaverton

 

The Westside Trail is an extension of a trail that begins in the Tualatin Hills Nature Park parking lot and continues south to Hart Meadows Park. After an unfinished section, it begins again at 163rd and continues to Murrayhill Powerline Park and Scholls Ferry Road. 8 miles one-way, portions are accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

MAX Blue Line, Merlo Rd/SW 158th Ave Station

Plan your trip

 

 

Buxton

 

Stub Stewart State Park

Photo: Chris Friend

Stub Stewart State Park

31 miles west of Portland, on the east side of Oregon 47

 

Stub Stewart State Park offers hike-in, bike-in camping, picnicking and more than 20 miles of trails in the park. The park also features two disc golf courses, one 18-hole and one 3-hole.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

 

 

Clackamas

Mount Talbert Nature Park

Mather Road, just east of I-205 and south of Sunnyside Road

 

Mount Talbert is a lava dome and the largest undeveloped butte in Northern Clackamas County. The nature park includes the top of the dome and the west facing slopes. The park offers parking, restrooms, picnic shelter and 4.2 miles of hiking trails that loop around the natural area and lead to the summit. Trails vary in length, some are accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

155-Sunnyside, 156-Mather Rd

Plan your trip

 

 

N Portland

Pier Park

North Lombard Street & Bruce Avenue, Portland

 

Pier Park's 87 acres includes a baseball field, basketball court, disabled access picnic area, disabled access restroom, disc golf, paved and unpaved paths, picnic area, playground, skatepark, soccer field, softball field, tennis court and water play feature. The park is accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

44-Capitol Hwy/Mocks Crest, 75-Cesar Chavez/Lombard

Plan your trip

 

 

NW Portland

Forest Park

EncMstr/Wikimedia

Forest Park

NW 29th Avenue & Upshur Street to Newberry Road, Portland

 

Forest Park's 5,156 acres includes natural areas, biking, hiking and equestrian trails and an abundance of wildlife. The 30-mile Wildwood Trail in Forest Park is part of the region's 40-Mile Loop. 70 miles of trails, fire lanes and gravel road, portions in the Washington Park section are accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to difficult, depending on trail

How to get there

Access available from many points, including MAX Blue or Red Line, 16-Front Ave/St Helens Rd, 20-Burnside/Stark

Plan your trip

 

 

SE Portland

Springwater Corridor

 

Springwater Corridor

The Springwater Corridor is a multi-use paved trail that extends from SE Ivon Street in Portland to Boring. It follows a railroad right-of-way and is designed for walkers, joggers, hikers, bicycles, wheelchairs and strollers. 20 miles, with easy on-off access for shorter trips, accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

Many entry points, all are reachable by bus and/or MAX.

Plan your trip

 

 

Eastbank Esplanade

Cacophony/Wikimedia

Eastbank Esplanade

SE Water Avenue & Hawthorne Boulevard, Portland

 

The esplanade extends north from the Hawthorne Bridge to the Steel Bridge and includes a boat dock, paved path for walking, running and biking, including a 1,200 foot floating walkway. 1.5 miles one-way, accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

Access available via numerous buses, including 4-Division/Fessenden, 6-Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, 10-Harold St, 14-Hawthorne, 15-Belmont/NW 23rd, 20-Burnside/Stark, 31-King Rd, 32-Oatfield, 33-McLoughlin

Plan your trip

 

 

Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge

SE 7th Avenue & Sellwood Boulevard, Portland

 

Oaks Bottom is one of the few remaining urban wetlands; it is located along the east bank of the Willamette River and is a birdwatcher�s paradise. 1 mile one-way, accessible from the Sellwood Park entrance.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

19-Woodstock/Glisan, 70-12th Ave

Plan your trip

 

 

Powell Butte

Ennetws/Wikimedia

Powell Butte Nature Park

16160 SE Powell Blvd., Portland

 

Powell Butte is an extinct cinder cone volcano and former dairy farm. It now is a 608-acre city park with a variety of biking, hiking and equestrian trails. Trails vary in length, some are accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

9-Powell/Broadway

Plan your trip

 

 

SW Portland

4T Trail (Council Crest)

M.O. Stevens/Wikimedia

Train, Trail, Tram, Trolley: The "4-T" Experience

Loop trip from downtown Portland to Council Crest

 

Experience the best of Portland's scenery and transit on this loop excursion. Begin by taking a MAX train to the Oregon Zoo in Washington Park. Follow the 4-T signs to a wooded trail up to Council Crest, the highest point in Portland. Then, have a street ramble down through several West Hills residential streets to the Portland Ariael Tram terminal on SW Gibbs Street. Enjoy the tram ride down Marquam Hill to the South Waterfront District. Here, you can easily return downtown on the Portland Streetcar. Roundtrip takes about 4 hours.

Difficulty

Moderate hike to Council Crest, due to elevation gain, not accessible

How to get there

Start at any westbound downtown MAX station and head to the Oregon Zoo.

Plan your trip

 

 

Hoyt Arboretum

samgrover/flickr

Hoyt Arboretum

4000 SW Fairview Blvd., Portland

 

Hoyt Arboretum is a 187-acre living museum of trees and plants. Self-guided walking maps are available at the Visitor's Center. 1 to 4 miles round-trip, all accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

20-Burnside/Stark, 63-Washington Park/Arlington Heights, 83-Washington Park Loop, MAX Blue or Red Line

Plan your trip

 

 

Tom McCall Waterfront Park

Northwesterner1/Wikimedia

Waterfront Park

Naito Parkway between SW Harrison Street & NW Glisan Street, Portland

 

The park consists of 29 acres along the west bank of Portland�s Willamette River. This is Portland's gathering area for events and festivals; includes a boat dock, restroom, fountain and paved paths for walking and biking. 2 miles one-way, accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

MAX Blue and Red lines and numerous buses, depending on point of entry.

Plan your trip

 

 

Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Finetooth/Wikimedia

Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Main entrance and nature center:
11321 SW Terwilliger Blvd., Portland

 

Tryon Creek offers 14 miles of hiking, biking and equestrian trails, a nature center and open-air shelter; located on the border of the city of Lake Oswego and SW Portland. Trails vary in length, trails around nature center are accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

Several entry points available via 38-Boones Ferry Rd and 39-Lewis and Clark, weekdays

Plan your trip

 

 

Washington Park

EncMstr/Wikimedia

Washington Park

Extending from West Burnside Street south to Highway 26 in Portland�s West Hills

 

A public urban park of 129 acres, with many trails linking to the adjacent Forest Park. Features include the Oregon Zoo, World Forestry Center, Hoyt Arboretum, children's museum, amphitheater, archery range, tennis courts and acres of wild forest with miles of hiking trails. Trails vary in length, many are accessible.

Difficulty

Easy to difficult

How to get there

MAX Blue and Red lines, 63-Washington Park/Arlington Heights, 83-Washington Park Loop

Plan your trip

 

 

Fanno Creek Greenway Trail

 

The Fanno Creek Greenway Trail corridor weaves gracefully through five cities and two counties. On its way to becoming one of the premier urban greenway trails in the Portland metropolitan region, this 15-mile corridor is a neighborhood dream long in the making. The recreational and commuter trail will take people from the shores of the Willamette River in Southwest Portland to the confluence of Fanno Creek and the Tualatin River.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

56 at Scholls Ferry/Allen, 76/78 at Hall, 45 and 62 at Scholls Ferry, 12, 45, 76/78 and 94 at Tigard TC, and 76 in Tualatin, WES at Tigard TC on weekdays

Plan your trip

 

 

St. Helens

Newton Road Loop

NW St. Helens Road (Hwy 30), just north of Marina Way

 

Newton Road Loop trail is a former mountain road that leads steeply up a ravine, connects with Forest Park�s Wildwood Trail and returns to St. Helens Road via a steep gravel road. The summit offers views of Sauvie Island and the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers. 4.4 miles roundtrip, not accessible.

Difficulty

Difficult

How to get there

16-Front Ave/St Helens Rd
NW St Helens & Marina Way (Stop ID 10291)

Plan your trip

 

 

Tualatin

Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge

SW Pacific Hwy (off Hwy 99W), 15 miles southwest of Downtown Portland

 

Tualatin River Refuge was established as an urban refuge to provide wetland, riparian, and upland habitats for a variety of migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, fish, other resident wildlife, and for the enjoyment of visitors. It is home to nearly 200 species of birds, over 50 species of mammals, 25 species of reptiles and amphibians, and a wide variety of insects, fish and plants.

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

How to get there

94-Pacific Hwy/Sherwood

Plan your trip