TriMet’s Labor Contract

TriMet and ATU reach tentative agreement on new contract

Agreement must now be voted on by TriMet’s Board of Directors and ATU membership

Today, TriMet and the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU), Local 757 reached a tentative agreement on a new labor contract. The agreement comes after eight negotiation sessions, four mediations sessions, and numerous offline discussions.

The tentative agreement sets forth the terms of a new Collective Bargaining Agreement for a three-year period beginning December 2016 and going through November 2019. The agreement will now go before TriMet’s Board of Directors to be ratified at its December Board meeting. The agreement must also be approved by the ATU membership. The tentative contract covers roughly 85% of TriMet’s nearly 3,000-employee workforce, who have been working without a contract since November 30, 2016.

TriMet and ATU reached the agreement after TriMet made a final comprehensive contract proposal. In it, approximately 40 of ATU’s proposals were included. Among those key provisions:

  • Wage increase: 3.0% (12/2016, retroactive), 3.25% (12/2017), 3.25% (12/2018).
  • Service Workers: In addition to the general wage increase, Service Workers would advance one step (resulting in an extra 6.6% wage increase (approximately) on top of the general wage increase.
  • $1,000 one-time payment to approximately 300 Journey Workers.
  • $1.00/hr. night shift differential for Station Agents, Dispatchers, Controllers, Road Supervisors, Rail Supervisors, Lead Supervisors, all Maintenance Division employees (up from $0.25 to $0.40/hr.)
  • $350 annual uniform allowance (up from $315).
  • Increase from $0.25 to $0.30 the rate per hour that unused sick leave hours upon retirement are converted to provide additional monthly pension benefits.
  • Increase in annual boot and jacket allowance to $200 for Maintenance Division workers (up from $150).
  • Three- and four-day workweeks made available to part-time Bus Operators

As part of the compromise proposal, TriMet reduced its outstanding proposals to one: the authority to hire an outside vendor to provide ground-up remanufacturing of its fleet of light rail vehicles (LRV), a process that will extend the life of the fleet and allow TriMet to respond to public demands for additional service despite a severe shortage of Journey Worker mechanics. The parties had earlier agreed to two other minor TriMet proposals along with a handful of housekeeping matters that are included in the Tentative Agreement. ATU also agreed to withdraw certain ULP charges as part of the deal.

“From the very start, I have said that a negotiated settlement — is the best outcome. I want to thank both the TriMet and the ATU negotiating teams for the arduous work that lead us to this tentative agreement,” remarked TriMet General Manager, Neil McFarlane. “What we have achieved through this process is not only good for TriMet’s team of union-represented employees, it’s good for our riders and stakeholders, as it underscores our commitment to providing safe, reliable transit throughout the Portland region.”

Fact checks

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