Performance Dashboard: July 2016

A snapshot of ridership, cost per ride, revenue, collisions, on-time performance and other measures.

Updated monthly, this dashboard provides a snapshot of TriMet’s financial and operating performance. These key indicators help us identify trends and measure our efficiency and effectiveness. We plan to expand this tool over time, so let us know how we can make it more useful for you.

Ridership

Bus & MAX Weekly Boarding Rides

This graph shows the weekly boarding rides taken on buses and MAX Light Rail, including transfers. If a rider takes two buses to get to work, it counts as two boarding rides.

LIFT & WES Weekly Boarding Rides

This graph shows the weekly boarding rides taken on WES Commuter Rail and LIFT Paratransit Service.

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Efficiency

Bus & MAX Operating Cost per Boarding Ride

This graph shows the direct cost of providing a ride on TriMet. Operating costs include the labor, energy and supplies required to provide service on the street and to maintain vehicles and facilities. If extra costs are incurred to add service, and ridership increases proportionally more than costs, the cost per ride will decline (even though total costs are increasing). Conversely, if ridership increases less than costs, the cost per ride will go up.

Frequent Service bus lines serve the highest demand bus corridors in the region with service about every 15 minutes during the morning and afternoon rush hours on weekdays. They often have even greater frequency during peak commute times.

Local bus lines connect to Frequent Service lines and/or MAX, while also serving many local trips and some regional corridors, with frequency targeted to the demand of the bus line.

LIFT & WES Operating Cost per Boarding Ride

This graph shows the direct cost of providing a ride on TriMet. Operating costs include the labor, energy and supplies required to provide service on the street and to maintain vehicles and facilities. If extra costs are incurred to add service, and ridership increases proportionally more than costs, the cost per ride will decline (even though total costs are increasing). Conversely, if ridership increases less than costs, the cost per ride will go up.

Frequent Service bus lines serve the highest demand bus corridors in the region with service about every 15 minutes during the morning and afternoon rush hours on weekdays. They often have even greater frequency during peak commute times.

Local bus lines connect to Frequent Service lines and/or MAX, while also serving many local trips and some regional corridors, with frequency targeted to the demand of the bus line.

On Time Performance

For buses and MAX, a vehicle is considered “on time” if it departs a scheduled timepoint no more than 1 minute early and no more than 5 minutes late.

For WES, trains that arrive at the destination station (Beaverton or Wilsonville) within 4 minutes of the scheduled time are considered on time.

A LIFT vehicle is considered on time if it arrives within 30 minutes of the scheduled pick-up time.

Vehicle Service Miles per Roadcall

For Fixed-Route bus, roadcalls with lost service are defined as a measure of average number of miles traveled per service-interrupting roadcall incident. The higher miles between service interruptions indicates better performance and system integrity. Roadcalls with lost service are counted when a mechanical malfunction prevents the bus from continuing its scheduled service and must be removed resulting in abandonment of services provided. Other incidents that cause vehicle to be taken out of service such as vehicular accidents or tires punctured due to on-road debris are not counted. Similar to LIFT, roadcalls are broken down between “Major” and “Minor” mechanical failures.

For MAX, Mean Distance Between Failure (MDBF) is a measure of miles between mechanical failures of systems critical to providing service. Examples of such systems are ramps, doors, couplers, propulsion systems and braking systems.

For WES, the relevant mechanical failure define as a mechanical or electrical failures on a commuter rail vehicle that causes service delay of more than four minutes at the destination platform for any trip.

For LIFT, a measure of the average number of miles traveled per roadcall incident. Roadcalls are classified as either “Major” or “Minor” mechanical failure. Major roadcalls pertain to any item that affects safety or mobility of the bus, such as problems with headlights, doors, brakes, engines, or transmissions. Minor roadcalls pertain to other systems of the bus such as air conditioning, radio system, and LIFT systems.

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Budget

Tax Revenue

This graph shows the sum of employer payroll tax, self-employment tax and state-in-lieu revenues for the last fiscal year and the current fiscal year to date. The employer payroll tax is levied on gross payrolls of private businesses and municipalities, and on net earnings of self-employed individuals within the TriMet service area. State of Oregon offices located within the service area are not subject to the payroll tax, but they make in-lieu tax payments to TriMet.

Passenger Revenue

Income received from passenger fares on fixed route and LIFT services. Includes cash, ticket, and pass fares as well as revenues from a variety of special fare programs. These fare programs include the low income fare program, Universal fare programs where an employer or College purchases annual/term passes (stickers) for all their employees/students, as well as more limited programs in which employers or colleges subsidize passes only for those who want them. Also includes subsidies from Portland Public Schools to allow Portland Public high school students to ride using their school ID.

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Safety

Bus Collisions per 100,000 Miles

This graph shows the fixed-route bus monthly collision rate per 100,000 miles. The rate includes all collisions involving TriMet buses, excluding minor mirror strike incidents. Preventability/liability is not distinguished in these figures. On a typical weekday, buses travel approximately 73,300 miles.

MAX Collisions per 100,000 Miles

This graph shows the MAX Light Rail monthly collision rate per 100,000 miles. The rate includes all collisions involving MAX. Preventability/liability is not distinguished in these figures. On a typical weekday, MAX trains travel approximately 11,600 miles.

WES Collisions

This graph shows the number of all WES Commuter Rail monthly collisions. Preventability/liability is not distinguished in these figures.

Collision Types

This graph shows collision types involving TriMet revenue vehicles by mode for the current month. Minor injury collisions do not involve medical transport.

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Data

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